Humans are complicated, children are even more complicated

[Had more dental surgery this week and am currently suffering from pain-induced ADD.  Expect less research and more wild speculation]

Consider pre-emptive testing for psychiatric or developmental issues in children.  If you’re too aggressive, you end up misdiagnosing a lot of perfectly normal deviations from the exact median as development issues in need of treatment.  Development is complicated, different systems come on line at different rates and in different orders in different kids, and they should be allowed to do that without being corralled into fitting a predetermined schedule .

But if you’re not aggressive enough, the kids develop coping mechanisms that hide the disability, making it harder to diagnose and treat.  Sometimes people treat this as solving the problem (especially for conditions that are often conflated with character flaws, like ADHD or some forms of depression), but they are wrong.  At best lack of treatment holds people back from their true potential, at worst it twists up their internal structure in ways that break at the worst possible time (usually grad school).  It’s a big problem with twice exceptional children, who have both brain-based deficiencies and a lot of raw intelligence, and I suspect for people with atypical presentations of their disabilities.  E.g. girls with ADHD or autism spectrum issues, boys with depression* or trauma from sexual abuse.**

Even perfectly accurate testing won’t fix this, because developmental asynchronies do not necessarily indicate a future problem, and treating them can prevent the issue from fixing itself.  The real issue is distinguishing natural, healthy leveling out from the development of costly compensation mechanisms, and we don’t know how to do that.

*Assuming the comomn adult male pattern of depression being expressed as anger holds true for boys as well.

**I think, couldn’t actually find data on this.

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